American Heart Association

Beta-blockers not likely to cause depression yet may contribute to sleep disturbances

Beta-blockers treat various cardiovascular diseases and were not more likely to cause depression compared to other similar treatments, according to new research published today in Hypertension, an American Heart Association journal. While depression may occur during beta-blocker therapy, the research suggests beta-blockers are not the likely cause.

Coffee lovers, rejoice! Drinking more coffee associated with decreased heart failure risk

Dietary information from three large, well-known heart disease studies suggests drinking one or more cups of caffeinated coffee may reduce heart failure risk, according to research published today in Circulation: Heart Failure, an American Heart Association journal.

Despite some advances, women still face disparities of the global burden of stroke

Issue Highlights: Nine manuscripts featuring research from around the world are featured in a special section of the February 2021 issue of the Stroke journal, published online today. The papers address stroke disparities in women including underrepresentation in clinical trials.

COVID-19 spurs new research on cardiac health of college athletes

American Heart Association and American Medical Society for Sports Medicine collaborate to evaluate impact to heart, improve detection and inform safe return to play.

New training modules help researchers bring science to life by improved communication

The American Heart Association and the TCU and UNTHSC School of Medicine collaborate on communications training series for scientists and researchers.

Updated guideline for heart valve disease spotlights less invasive treatments

American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Clinical Practice Guideline

The American Heart Association responds to selection of President-elect Biden’s public health nominees

President-elect Biden today announced his nominees for key public health positions in his incoming administration. The American Heart Association, the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke, released the following statement: “We look forward to working with the incoming Biden administration and its experienced public health team to support […]

Health care organizations nationwide continue to make hypertension a priority

The American Heart Association and American Medical Association recognize more than 1,000 organizations for efforts to reduce the number of patients with uncontrolled blood pressure

Rivaroxaban may be as effective as warfarin for bioprosthetic mitral valves, AF

The RIVER trial is the largest study assessing the efficacy and safety of the anticoagulant rivaroxaban in patients with an artificial mitral valve to correct an irregular heart rhythm. Researchers concluded that rivaroxaban worked as well as the standard anticoagulant medication warfarin.

Heart disease awareness decline spotlights urgency to reach younger women and women of color

American Heart Association special report highlights trends in awareness among women in the U.S.

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